About Us

 

About Rotary

Rotary is a community of friends who are committed to creating positive change in the world. Find out how joining your local club can enrich your life and improve the lives of people living in your neighborhood and across the globe.

Quotes from members about why we like Rotary:
I enjoy networking with like-minded individuals in the Council Bluffs community.
Working together with others to serve.
I enjoy fellowship the most.

WHAT IS ROTARY?

Rotary brings together people who want to use their skills, experiences, and expertise to solve some of the world’s most pressing problems — from organizing local initiatives like feeding the hungry to global efforts like eradicating polio.

It all begins at the weekly club meeting, where members catch up with friends, hear what’s happening in their community, and organize club activities and service projects. It’s a fun way to connect with the people in your community who share your passion for doing good.

WHY SHOULD I JOIN A ROTARY CLUB?

People like you join Rotary to meet new people and get involved in their communities. As a Rotary club member, you’ll also have the chance to:

  • Connect with community leaders who care about issues facing your hometown and hometowns around the world
  • Apply your personal experience and professional skills to solving challenges and creating positive change
  • Network and develop your professional skills, including public speaking, fundraising, and project planning
  • Involve your family and friends in your efforts to improve the world

OUR STRUCTURE

Rotary is made up of three parts: at the heart of Rotary are our clubs, that are supported by Rotary International and The Rotary Foundation.

Rotary clubs bring together dedicated individuals to exchange ideas, build relationships, and take action.

Rotary International supports Rotary clubs worldwide by coordinating global programs, campaigns, and initiatives.

The Rotary Foundation uses generous donations to fund projects by Rotarians and our partners in communities around the world. As a nonprofit, all of the Foundation’s funding comes from voluntary contributions made by Rotarians and friends who share our vision of a better world.

Together, Rotary clubs, Rotary International, and The Rotary Foundation work to make lasting improvements in our communities and around the world.

“Did you Know”


  • Rotary currently has over 1.2 million members and 34,000 clubs world wide.
  • Rotary and its Rotarians provided 2.5 million “charity miles” from United Airlines to transport children to the U.S. for surgeries and medical care and to Engineers Without Borders for water projects and other humanitarian projects.
  • The Rotary Club of Fishers, IN, in partnership with the Freetown Rotary Club of Sierra Leone, has provided 100 wells in Sierra Leone. That’s one heck of a water project!
  • Since 1947 Rotarians have contributed $2.9 billion to The Rotary Foundation (TRF).
  • Rotarians contributed $109 million in EREY contributions to TRF. That, along with $83 million in Polio Plus contributions and $16 million in contributions to the Permanent Fund, equals $208 million in total cash contributions for 2011. TRF currently has $795 million. You’ll be proud to know that administrative expenses for TRF are only 2% of the amount raised and total administrative costs, which include all development costs, totaled 7%. TRF paid out $168 million in grants during 2011.
  • India has been removed from the endemic list of countries being free of polio for over a year. Only Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria still have cases of polio.
  • Ted Turner said, “I would be proud and enthusiastic to be associated with Rotary in any way.” I wonder if anyone has asked him to join.
  • Shelter Box, an organization that provides emergency shelter and life saving supplies, is now officially associated with Rotary. They have responded to over 200 disasters in 75 countries and have provided aid to over $1 million people in their 11 years of service.
  • There were 4 members at the first Rotary meeting in Chicago. 2 of them dropped out after only a couple of years. The 5th member who attended the 2nd meeting, Harry Ruggles, is responsible for the singing we do at meetings. So if you don’t like to sing, blame Harry.
  • Our own Dr. Phil Meyer is traveling with the District 5650 Zambian Project May 8-29 to lend his skills as a pediatrician. Fine money collected at April meetings will be sent with Phil to be used where it’s needed most.

    Facts about the Rotary Club

     


    • Rotary currently has over 1.2 million members and 34,000 clubs world wide.
    • Rotary and its Rotarians provided 2.5 million “charity miles” from United Airlines to transport children to the U.S. for surgeries and medical care and to Engineers Without Borders for water projects and other humanitarian projects.
    • The Rotary Club of Fishers, IN, in partnership with the Freetown Rotary Club of Sierra Leone, has provided 100 wells in Sierra Leone. That’s one heck of a water project!
    • Since 1947 Rotarians have contributed $2.9 billion to The Rotary Foundation (TRF).
    • Rotarians contributed $109 million in EREY contributions to TRF. That, along with $83 million in Polio Plus contributions and $16 million in contributions to the Permanent Fund, equals $208 million in total cash contributions for 2011. TRF currently has $795 million. You’ll be proud to know that administrative expenses for TRF are only 2% of the amount raised and total administrative costs, which include all development costs, totaled 7%. TRF paid out $168 million in grants during 2011.
    • India has been removed from the endemic list of countries being free of polio for over a year. Only Pakistan, Afghanistan and Nigeria still have cases of polio.
    • Ted Turner said, “I would be proud and enthusiastic to be associated with Rotary in any way.” I wonder if anyone has asked him to join.
    • Shelter Box, an organization that provides emergency shelter and life saving supplies, is now officially associated with Rotary. They have responded to over 200 disasters in 75 countries and have provided aid to over $1 million people in their 11 years of service.
    • There were 4 members at the first Rotary meeting in Chicago. 2 of them dropped out after only a couple of years. The 5th member who attended the 2nd meeting, Harry Ruggles, is responsible for the singing we do at meetings. So if you don’t like to sing, blame Harry.
    • Our own Dr. Phil Meyer is traveling with the District 5650 Zambian Project May 8-29 to lend his skills as a pediatrician. Fine money collected at April meetings will be sent with Phil to be used where it’s needed most.